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Marketplace Morning Report

Can Baltimore’s new funding approach solve the "education debt"?

Amy Scott and Eliza Mills Jan 26, 2018
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This week in Baltimore, the school board approved a new plan to fund city schools based on poverty rates. Previously, funds were distributed based on test scores, with schools getting extra money for advanced students as well as for low-performing students who might need more services. The new plan aims to address the ways that poverty affects student achievement, which raises a question: Can more money fix what’s been called the “education debt?” Jack Schneider, assistant professor of education at the College of the Holy Cross, joined Marketplace Weekend to discuss.

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