Is there really a political divide between people who leave their hometowns and those who stay?

Marketplace Staff Jun 22, 2017
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Slava Bowman/Visualhunt

Is there really a political divide between people who leave their hometowns and those who stay?

Marketplace Staff Jun 22, 2017
Slava Bowman/Visualhunt
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Many view the divisions in our current political environment through a “conservative vs. liberal” or “Democrat vs. Republican” filter. After all, a large number of people in both of the major political parties have said that the other group elicits feelings of fear and anger

But what if there was another way to look at the tension and disagreements that exist in the U.S.? The Guardian’s Chris Arnade makes the case that the country is structured in a couple of major ways: Those with elite educations and those without, and those who have left their hometowns and those who have stayed. Those who stay in their communities, for example, are more likely to support President Trump, he said. Especially white voters. 

We wanted to know whether this analysis rings true in your life. Here were some of your responses. 

Many of you were on board with Arnade’s argument:

Others gave their reasons for why they think worldview could be connected to your decision to leave or stay home:

Some of you disagreed with the analysis — whether you moved away and are pro-Trump, or stayed home and are liberal:

…while others made the argument that factors such as racism had to do with Trump’s victory:

Some made the argument that political preferences transcend location:

 

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