Global trade growth is lackluster, so why all the controversy?

Kai Ryssdal Oct 31, 2016
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An inflatable Trojan horse is seen as people demonstrate outside the European Union headquarters in Brussels, on September 20, 2016 to protest against huge transatlantic trade deals linking Europe with Canada and the United States. JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images

Global trade growth is lackluster, so why all the controversy?

Kai Ryssdal Oct 31, 2016
An inflatable Trojan horse is seen as people demonstrate outside the European Union headquarters in Brussels, on September 20, 2016 to protest against huge transatlantic trade deals linking Europe with Canada and the United States. JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images
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The global economy in which we all live and work has been blamed for a lot of things this election cycle. Too many factory jobs leaving the country and not enough of our domestic-made products doing the same. To hear the politicians tell it, trade is a terrible thing. Turns out, though, trade has problems of its own. Binyamin Appelbaum writes of them in the New York Times and spoke with Kai Ryssdal.

 

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