Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Trump's WTO KO

Dec 12, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Have a shopping story to tell? Let us know! Email us

Will deporting undocumented workers take us back to the Great Recession?

Rounak Maiti Sep 21, 2016
Share Now on:
John Moore/Getty Images

Implementing a mass deportation of undocumented workers would reduce cumulative GDP over 10 years by $4.7 trillion — a similar decline in revenue and employment caused by the Great Recession, according to a new study released today by the Center for American Progress.

A move of that magnitude would erase 5 percent of U.S. labor and have a drastic impact on production rates of every industry, according to the study.

While America’s 11.3 million undocumented immigrants make up a mere 3.5 percent of the population, it is estimated that 7 million of them — or more than 60 percent — are workers, across the public and private sector.

The CAP’s study adds to a growing collection of data around the country’s reliance on undocumented workers. Last month, conservative policy group American Action Forum released another study that said the private sector alone would lose more than $300 billion and 2 million workers. 

The Center for American Progress’s study estimated that the federal government would lose nearly $900 billion in revenue over 10 years —- and this doesn’t even include the physical cost of transporting immigrants out of the country, which will be more than $100 billion itself.

Mass deportation would not just affect industries like agriculture, or construction — industries that commonly employ undocumented immigrants.

Some of the largest industries in the United States, which are often not associated with illegal labor, will also feel the effects. This, according to the CAP, is because of the varying sizes of industries and how removing large populations of labor will affect the national GDP. Finance, manufacturing, and retail and wholesale would each witness a loss of more than $50 billion.

These findings are especially bad news for states with large numbers of immigrant workers. The study suggests that a state like California would lose $8.2 billion, or 21 percent, of its agricultural industry GDP alone, and lose 5 percent of GDP, or more than $100 billion, across all industries.

A full interactive of the CAP’s state-by-state breakdown is available here.

CORRECTION: This article has been changed to reflect that the study compared these economic effects to the effects of the Great Recession, and that the estimated loss of revenue does not include the cost associated with the act of deportation.

 

 

 

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

Closing the sock market soon!

 

Time is running out to get BOTH new Marketplace Sock designs for only $5/month.

Don’t wait – this special offer ends soon!