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Kroger tries to push more consumers to ‘cage-free’

Kimberly Adams Sep 9, 2016
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Multiple big names in the food industry are starting to make cage-free eggs. miheco/Flickr

Kroger tries to push more consumers to ‘cage-free’

Kimberly Adams Sep 9, 2016
Multiple big names in the food industry are starting to make cage-free eggs. miheco/Flickr
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Grocery store chain Kroger releases earnings Friday. It’s one of several big names in the food industry making a commitment to “cage-free” eggs, with plans to shift its whole supply chain to cage free by 2025.

To encourage consumers to make the switch, Kroger announced a new, less expensive line of cage-free eggs this week. One of the ways the company was able to bring down the cost was by switching to less expensive packaging than is usually used for cage-free eggs.

But according to Ken Klippen of the National Association of Egg Farmers, the push by many companies to go cage-free doesn’t match consumer demand and puts too much of a burden on producers.

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