Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

A growing industry caters to college cheats

Amy Scott Aug 30, 2016
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Some students are cheating on more than just a term paper.
Visual Hunt

Here’s a troubling thought as college classes start up again: More than two-thirds of college students admit to having cheated on an assignment.

The Chronicle of Higher Education spent months investigating a growing industry that has cropped up to help those students cheat.

With the rise of online courses, students aren’t just buying term papers or one-off assignments, said Chronicle reporter Brad Wolverton.

“Now you can literally buy a whole course,” he said. “You can pay someone, hand over your log-in information, your password, and then they can sign in using your identity and take the whole class for you.”  

Wolverton found at least a dozen companies offering such services for as little as $600 a class, with names like TakeYourClass.com and NoNeedtoStudy.com. Some even guarantee at least a B grade.

“It’s part of a trend that’s been happening over the last couple decades of the commodification of education,” said Teresa Fishman, who directs the International Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University.“The students and the people who are selling these services have the idea that all that really matters is the end, and that the processes that get you there aren’t really significant.”

To fight cheating, she said, colleges need to do a better job of teaching the value and relevance of learning.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.