What’s in store for Turkey’s future

David Brancaccio Jul 18, 2016
HTML EMBED:
COPY
People are seen through a Turkish flag as they block the entrance of the Armored troops school in the capital of Ankara. ILYAS AKENGIN/AFP/Getty Images

What’s in store for Turkey’s future

David Brancaccio Jul 18, 2016
People are seen through a Turkish flag as they block the entrance of the Armored troops school in the capital of Ankara. ILYAS AKENGIN/AFP/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

After a military-backed coup in Turkey failed over the weekend, forces loyal to the country’s government have been rounding up perceived opponents of the regime. But the Turkish economy continues to function, despite the region’s political turmoil. Its currency, the lira, fell 4.6 percent on Friday as the news broke, but has recovered about half of that in trading so far today.

What does this all mean for Turkey’s future? Or even Europe’s future?  Ian Bremmer, the president and cofounder of the Eurasia Group, joined us to talk about where the country seems to be headed.

Bremmer on Turkey’s efforts to join the European Union:

It’s really a non-starter. I don’t think  there’s anyone among the main European Union countries that believed that Turkey was ever going to make it towards full membership. But the wedge that’s being driven between rule of law, common values — I mean, all the things that brought the EU together as their initial experiment…look the farthest they’ve ever been for the Turks at this point. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full interview.

 

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.