Food riots and ransacking break out as Venezuelans voice anger

Kai Ryssdal Jun 20, 2016
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A woman with a sign reading 'We starve' protests against new emergency powers decreed this week by President Nicolas Maduro in front of a line of riot policemen in Caracas on May 18, 2016. Public outrage was expected to spill onto the streets of Venezuela Wednesday, with planned nationwide protests marking a new low point in Maduro's unpopular rule.  FEDERICO PARRA/AFP/Getty Images

Food riots and ransacking break out as Venezuelans voice anger

Kai Ryssdal Jun 20, 2016
A woman with a sign reading 'We starve' protests against new emergency powers decreed this week by President Nicolas Maduro in front of a line of riot policemen in Caracas on May 18, 2016. Public outrage was expected to spill onto the streets of Venezuela Wednesday, with planned nationwide protests marking a new low point in Maduro's unpopular rule.  FEDERICO PARRA/AFP/Getty Images
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Marketplace correspondent Scott Tong was down in Venezuela a couple of months ago and brought back stories of what it’s like to live in a lopsided economy. An economy where oil is basically the only thing an entire country has going for it.

There’s now news out of Caracas — and the rest of the Venezuelan economy as well — about how much worse it’s gotten just since this spring. Looting, food riots, and shortages of virtually everything.

Girish Gupta is the Reuters correspondent in Caracas and spoke with Kai Ryssdal about the scene on the streets of Caracas.

Click the audio player above to hear the interview. 

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