Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Saudi deputy crown prince meets President Obama

Ashley Milne-Tyte Jun 17, 2016
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Mohammed bin Salman arriving at a summit held in the Saudi capital Riyadh in 2015. 
FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images

On Friday, President Barack Obama meets with a Saudi prince who’s been on a charm offensive in the U.S. this week.

Thirty-year-old Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is trying to revamp Saudi Arabia’s economy in the wake of the country’s oil crisis, and he’s seeking the support of the U.S.

The country has big privatization plans. Even the national oil company isn’t excluded.

Jacob Kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, said the Saudis want American investors to buy those assets “because it would give more American economic entities a stake in the long-term economic success of the Saudi government.”

They may not want one.

Nader Hashemi, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Denver, said world events are eroding the U.S.-Saudi  relationship. The rise of ISIS is linked to Wahhabi Islam, which began in Saudi Arabia.

“And the spread of this particular toxic interpretation of Sunni Islam has gone global,” he said, “and is now affecting young kids not only in Orlando, Florida, but there were direct links to Saudi Arabia in the San Bernardino massacre.”

Still, most politicians won’t risk the economic and political consequences of loosening those Saudi ties, he said.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.