Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

The nest is full

Oct 11, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable

The boy who saved Batman

Tommy Andres Mar 23, 2016
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Kich Anfoly/Flickr

It was a cold night in January 1966. Michael Uslan was fourteen years old and waiting for the first TV episode of Batman to start. But, when the show came on the air, Uslan was horrified by what he what he saw: comic book graphics “Pow!” “Zap!” “Wham!” splashed across the screen as a cheesy surf rock theme song played in the background. Uslan felt as if the whole world was laughing at Batman. He made a vow, not unlike Bruce Wayne, to one day show the world who the true caped crusader was.

In the 1970s, Uslan was a student at Indiana University. It was a time when comics were denounced as subversive trash for America’s youth, but it was also a period of great experimentation on college campuses. Uslan had an idea and he pitched it to IU’s College of Arts and Sciences. In a tense exchange with the college dean, Uslan asked to teach a course on comic books, equating today’s superheros with the ancient mythology. To his surprise, the dean agreed and Uslan became the world’s first college professor of comic books.

Word about Uslan’s classes traveled fast and he was offered a job writing at DC comics, where Batman was created. Still an undergrad, he took the job as a summer gig while continuing his education and teaching his comic book course. By the late 1970’s, Uslan was writing Batman comics for DC, but the comic strip had all but lost its appeal since the 1966 TV show. It had become a sorely neglected comic no one wanted to be a part of. This was Uslan’s moment to fulfill his vow to himself and to Batman lovers everywhere. At a time when everyone at DC saw no future in the dark knight, Uslan stood up and bought the rights to Batman.

A decade later, Uslan helped bring Batman to Hollywood as the executive producer of Tim Burton’s box office success. Since then, Uslan has been an executive producer on every Batman movie, including the Dark Knight franchise and Hollywood’s most recent installment, “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.”

He recounts his life with Batman in his new memoir, “The Boy Who Loved Batman.”

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

Check Your Balance ™️
Check Your Balance ™️
Personal finance from Marketplace. Where the economy, your personal life and money meet.

Thank you to all the donors who made our fall drive a success!

It’s Investors like you that keep Marketplace going strong!