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Marketplace Morning Report
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Marketplace Morning Report

A royal future?

Jan 20, 2020
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Anxiety Index®

The economy’s improving, but Americans’ economic anxiety persists

Dave Shaw Mar 14, 2016
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The latest Marketplace poll shows no change since the fall in levels of economic stress. Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Anxiety Index®

The economy’s improving, but Americans’ economic anxiety persists

Dave Shaw Mar 14, 2016
The latest Marketplace poll shows no change since the fall in levels of economic stress. Mark Wilson/Getty Images
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By most macroeconomic indicators, the American economy has gotten stronger in the last few months. Job growth has averaged more than 250,000 a month since the fall, and in December the Federal Reserve deemed the economy strong enough to withstand its first interest rate hike since the recession.

But that hasn’t translated to lower levels of economic stress, according to the latest Marketplace Edison-Research Poll. The Marketplace Economic Anxiety Index — a trackable number derived from some of the poll’s questions — held steady at a score of 31 on a scale from zero to 100. The higher the number, the more stress someone is feeling.

Check your own score by taking our online quiz.

Why didn’t the number budge? Because Americans continue to feel anxious about their economic situation and feel worried about meeting monthly expenses. 

Among the more than 1,000 people surveyed, more than 60 percent reported feeling at least some anxiousness about their financial situations, while 30 percent said concern over their financial situation is causing them to lose sleep. 

The level of anxiety is higher among hourly workers compared to those who earn a salary, while those who identified as African American and Hispanic reported higher economic anxiety levels than whites. 

The Economic Anxiety Index was developed in fall 2015 as a way to gauge the economic mood over time and among different subgroups. The survey conducted by Edison Research had 1,012 respondents with a margin of error of 3 percent.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.