Go-playing computer: 2 Humans: 0

Kai Ryssdal Mar 10, 2016
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Lee Se-Dol, one of the greatest modern players of the ancient board game Go, walks past cameramen after the second game of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match at a hotel in Seoul on March 10, 2016. A Google-developed supercomputer bested a South Korean Go grandmaster again on March 10, taking a commanding 2-0 lead in a five-game series that has become a stunning global debut for a new style of 'intuitive' artificial intelligence. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

Go-playing computer: 2 Humans: 0

Kai Ryssdal Mar 10, 2016
Lee Se-Dol, one of the greatest modern players of the ancient board game Go, walks past cameramen after the second game of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match at a hotel in Seoul on March 10, 2016. A Google-developed supercomputer bested a South Korean Go grandmaster again on March 10, taking a commanding 2-0 lead in a five-game series that has become a stunning global debut for a new style of 'intuitive' artificial intelligence. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images
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I was talking yesterday with Molly Wood about that computer that beat the world’s best player at Go — one of the most complicated board games in the world.

The robots won the first game, and I joked about how I was ready for my robot overlords, remember?

Yeah. The computer won again today.

The human who got beat, Lee Se-dol, said, “I really feel that AlphaGo played a near-perfect game.”

Robots overlords, y’all. Robot overlords.

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