What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell us
A new study finds that free streaming sites used to watch football matches largely feature ads with malware. Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images
By The Numbers

Streaming football could be bad for your computer

Marketplace Staff Feb 1, 2016
A new study finds that free streaming sites used to watch football matches largely feature ads with malware. Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images
21

That’s how many people were arrested in China on Monday for running an elaborate Ponzi scheme. Online finance company Ezubao sold fake investment products to its investors, ultimately taking in $7.6 billion. As the New York Times reports, the company was part of a growing peer-to-peer lending market in China — with such a big player under scrutiny, the security of this kind of lending is being called into question.

$1 billion

That’s how much Dr. Ken Kaitin at the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development says it could cost to get a Zika vaccine to market. Complicating matters: with pregnant women and children at risk, the challenges of developing treatment are even greater.

8 million

That’s how many visits per month some of the most popular football streaming sites attract. And according to a new study, that’s a problem. As BBC Tech writes, as much as half of these sites were found to be featuring ads with malware, putting football fans’ computers and devices at risk.

3.4 percent

That’s the current unemployment rate in Iowa; enviable by most other states. But as some economists point out, it’s not necessarily all good news — Iowa is experiencing worker due to the challenge of keeping Iowans from leaving the state for places with higher wages.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.