The Arts Shrink will see you now

Raghu Manavalan Aug 14, 2015
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The Arts Shrink will see you now

Raghu Manavalan Aug 14, 2015
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Business and art don’t seem like two fields that would naturally overlap. After all, many individuals who become artists do so to follow their creative passion and not worry about the drudgery of health insurance or fundraising to succeed.

But that can be a self-defeating attitude. Corbett Barklie, known as the Arts Shrink for KCET’s Artbound, says, “I think that a lot of artists that I work with really embrace this notion of a starving artist, the idea that they’ll sit in a drafty attic, and they’ll do their work and they won’t be recognized. And also going along with that is that emotional angst that even adds to how romantic that idea [of becoming an artist] is.”

Barklie works as an arts consultant and professor, and in her column, provides answers about how to make a living following what you love.

“I think that every artist has to look at their relationship with this idea of starving and angst and correct it, before they can have a career that really does provide a living for them, also.”

Selected columns from the Arts Shrink:

Why do some artists get all the money?

How to make your crowd-funding campaign stand out

What’s the most common mistake artists make?

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