The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

Molly Wood Jul 3, 2015
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The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

Molly Wood Jul 3, 2015
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The Federal Communications Commission has now been in the business of enforcing net neutrality for a little less than a month and it’s been busy. The FCC promptly fined AT&T $100 million for throttling some users unlimited data access. Sprint said it would stop doing the same thing now that the new rules are in effect. 

One formal net neutrality complaint has already been filed, and businesses and the government are trying to figure out what the Internet service game looks like now.

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler explains how the government agency suddenly has a lot more going on:

“Let’s face it, the Internet is redefining all of our lives. It’s an incredibly personal experience for all of us. When you put rules in place that say that there’ll be no blocking, there’ll be no throttling and there will be no paying for some kind of special priority treatment, we’ve established the rules for the road. We’re not going to tell the players how to play the game. We’re not going to get in there and micromanage like old time regulation used to, but we’re going to be on the field ready to throw a flag if there’s a foul.” 

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