Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

The nest is full

Oct 11, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

What will happen to state-run insurance exchanges?

Adam Allington Jun 26, 2015
Share Now on:

The Supreme Court upheld a key part of the Affordable Care Act on Thursday, enabling health insurance subsidies to all qualifying Americans.

The ruling firmly establishes the legality of Obamacare, but quite a few states had already moved forward in creating their own insurance exchanges.

The states that set up their own exchanges — mostly Democratic ones — were really trying to get out ahead and help support Obamacare, says Larry Levitt, a senior vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

“But, it turned out that creating these exchanges was a whole lot more difficult than people thought, especially creating the IT infrastructure,” says Levitt. “Now [that Healthcare.gov is] working quite well, and it’s probably better than most state-based marketplaces.”    

Levitt says now that the health care law is here to stay, those states may want to think about letting Healthcare.gov take over.

Christine Eibner, a senior economist at RAND specializing in health care policy, says whether these state exchanges remain or go, at least now they can start making decisions.

“You know, I think it just creates a lot more certainty,” Eibner says. “Now it frees up states and the federal government to begin, if they want, to make changes or adapt their websites or move forward with decision-making; there’s not uncertainty anymore.” 

State-run exchanges are also expensive. They were initially established with the help of federal grants.  That money is no longer available, and state exchanges are supposed to be paid for through subscriber fees. 

 Therefore states with smaller populations, such as Hawaii or Vermont, may find it more cost-effective to switch over to the federal exchange, Levitt says.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

Check Your Balance ™️
Check Your Balance ™️
Personal finance from Marketplace. Where the economy, your personal life and money meet.

Thank you to all the donors who made our fall drive a success!

It’s Investors like you that keep Marketplace going strong!