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By The Numbers

We are never, ever, ever … giving away free music

Tony Wagner Jun 22, 2015
July 30

The launch date for Apple Music, and the start of its controversial three-month trial period. The tech giant came under fire last week for reportedly forcing artists to forgo royalties during the trial. Apple caved late Sunday night after Taylor Swift posted an open letter shaming the company, the Verge reported.

1,000 robots

That’s how many “Peppers” — a humanoid robot that can recognize human emotion — were made available for purchase on Saturday in Japan. Pepper costs around $1,600, with $200 in monthly fees. And as CNN reports, the first batch of bots sold out in about a minute.

$250,000

That’s how high the average price is for an Indian wedding with hundreds of guests and days of festivities, one planner told Marketplace Weekend. It’s a booming industry, and venues and vendors see lots of dollar signs.

$47 billion

That was the amount of money put forth by health insurer Anthem in a proposed deal to buy one of its competitors, Cigna. But that offer was later rejected by Cigna. Still, as the New York Times reports, its just one of several moves being made by health insurers to try and consolidate in a new market created by the Affordable Care Act.

2,900

That’s how many interns Goldman Sachs is bringing on this year, and it’s instituting new policies to reduce their stress level, Reuters reported. Now interns at Goldman will be required to leave the offices between midnight and 7 a.m., and take Saturdays off. Nothing says low-stress like a 17-hour workday, right?

33 officiants

That’s how many are employed by Alan Katz’s 24-hour elopement chapel in Long Beach, California. In his 11 years running the business, Katz says he’s seen the number of people looking to elope grow exponentially. The reason: like any other successful business, they offer lower prices and convenience.

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