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By The Numbers

One IPO please, and super-size it

Tony Wagner and Beidi Zhang May 5, 2015
260 percent

This is how much Shake Shack has grown since the burger chain went public in January, according to Reuters. About half a dozen fast-casual restaurant chains have had big IPOs last year. These companies cater to an emerging generation of younger diners who are looking for alternatives to McDonald’s.

$2,780

A poor child growing up in Los Angeles County – where Marketplace is based – can expect to earn that much less by age 26 than the national average. Even the children of one-percenters in LA see a drop, $4,460  less than the national average. What does that mean? Compared to the rest of the country, LA County has very poor economic mobility. A new study out of Harvard finds these drop-offs are not limited to Southern California. The Upshot’s report on the study will customize to report on your county, or any county you choose.

30,000

That’s about how many people Carly Fiorina reportedly laid off while she was head of Hewlett-Packard. Someone registered carlyfiorina.org to remind people of that as Fiorina announced her White House bid Monday. Former CEOs who run for office have a few things going for them – knowledge of the economy, proven experience as a leader and often a conservative record that could attract voters. But being head of a large company also means your record as a job creator – or a job cutter – is out in the open.

20,588

That’s how many complaints of age discrimination were filed last year, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Fortune notes this number has been increasing since the dot-com boom, and some of that growth may be tied to employers looking to hire so-called “digital natives.” The phrase is correlated with age, though some hiring managers defend its use as a quick way of describing strong digital skills.

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