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Two cybersecurity agencies diverged in a wood…

Ben Johnson and Aparna Alluri Feb 11, 2015
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Two cybersecurity agencies diverged in a wood…

Ben Johnson and Aparna Alluri Feb 11, 2015
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In the last month, President Barack Obama has spoken about new cybersecurity initiatives several times. This week, his administration announced that it will establish a new government agency to fight the growing threat of cyberattacks.

The Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center, as it will be called, is expected to coordinate intelligence from similar agencies across the U.S. government  agencies that already exist within the FBI, the NSA, and the Department of Homeland Security.

But that’s easier said than done, says Stephen Cobb, a security researcher at ESET North America. For one, there is already an agency called the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, whose purpose is to protect the U.S.’ “critical infrastructure from physical and cyber threats.” The only difference, Cobb says, is that it reports to the Department of Homeland Security, whereas the new agency will answer to the Office of Director of National Intelligence.

Sound like the two cybersecurity agencies are being driven apart?

“I hope not but that is the fear,” says Cobb. “The best and most effective role of our government is to identify and sanction people doing this, which is something which is very hard for the private sector to do.”

 

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