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The euro is dropping, but airfares aren’t

Noel King Jan 22, 2015
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A Virgin Atlantic passenger plane comes in for a landing at Heathrow Airport. (Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

The euro is dropping, but airfares aren’t

Noel King Jan 22, 2015
A Virgin Atlantic passenger plane comes in for a landing at Heathrow Airport. (Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)
HTML EMBED:
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Your dollar may go further in Europe these days — but you’ll have to get there first.

Airlines know that a weak euro will boost tourism, and they’re raising the price of tickets from the U.S. to Europe, Asia and South America accordingly. On the flip side, airlines are cutting prices on flights originating in Europe to ensure demand remains high.

As fuel prices hit record highs over the past decade, many airlines ditched gas-guzzling jumbo jets for smaller aircraft with fewer seats. A drop in fuel prices may mean that some of those larger carriers return to the skies. That should — and the key word is should — lead to a drop in prices.

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