By The Numbers

The numbers for October 29, 2014

Tony Wagner Oct 29, 2014

The Red Cross claimed to deliver 17 million meals and stacks, 74,000 shelter stays and 7 million blankets and flashlights to victims of Hurricane Sandy. But a joint investigation from ProPublica and NPR not only casts doubt on the organization’s own tracking, but shows a pattern of prioritizing public relations over aid after hurricanes Sandy and Issac.

The investigation found the Red Cross was unprepared for the disasters and botched the delivery of meals, supplies and other aid. Response was slow and meals were wasted, and in one case an official reportedly ordered volunteers to drive around empty trucks to give the appearance of relief.

In other news: More earnings are on the way today and there will be an official announcement from the Fed on quantitative easing. For now, here’s what we’re reading – and the numbers we’re watching – Wednesday.

$1.7 trillion

That’s what the Fed has spent on bonds in just the third round of quantitative easing, or QE3. That’s according to the New York Time’s Upshot, which has seven charts laying out the program’s history and future.

74,829

As of Wednesday morning, that’s how many people follow SugarString on Twitter. The site posits itself as a slick tech/lifestyle news site “presented” by Verizon, but the Daily Dot reported that corporate “presenters” have handed down a big restriction: no writing about domestic surveillance or net neutrality, two topics Verizon is very involved in.

4

The number of meals in a day, according to Taco Bell. The restaurant is the first fast-food joint to offer nationwide mobile ordering via a new app launched today. Taco Bell made the announcement through a bit of social media jujitsu, the Verge reported, seemingly erasing its popular Twitter account to push users toward the app. In reality, the restaurant’s tweets and 1.4 million followers are hiding the protected account @totallynothere.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.