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The numbers for October 21, 2014

Tony Wagner Oct 21, 2014

McDonald’s and Coca-Cola both reported disappointing earnings Tuesday morning, with 30 percent and 14 percent drops in revenue respectively. Both companies saw declining sales in the U.S. and Europe, and the fast food chain is still grappling with a scandal in China.

Yahoo’s earnings call is expected after markets close today, it’s make-or-break for CEO Marissa Mayer, who will likely address the company’s acquisition strategy and stake in Alibaba.

Here are some more stories we’re reading, and other numbers we’re watching, Tuesday.

5

Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison for killing his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, last year. Pistorius’ lawyer said the Olympian could only serve 10 months before being placed under house arrest. The sentence was handed down by the second black woman to become a high court judge in South Africa, Thokozile Masipa.

7

 The number of YouTube stars appearing in a new collaboration between Google and Lionsgate to promote the studio’s new “Hunger Games” movie, AdAge reported. It’s a high-profile push into branded entertainment for YouTube, and just the latest example of a big corporation exploring the value of Internet celebrities. 

$50 million

That’s how much Kansas City could potentially make once business from the run-up to the World Series and the games themselves are all totaled. But other expenses, like the $225,000 parade thrown by San Francisco when the Giants won in 2012, have some questioning whether the costs involved in hosting a large sporting event mean the benefits are more modest than projected.

2

That’s how many “Notorious R.B.G.” shirts Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg has given to NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg. Ginsberg is apparently relishing in her meme status, and has collected “quite a large supply” of the shirts.

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