The American Indian College Fund turns 25

Amy Scott Oct 20, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The American Indian College Fund turns 25

Amy Scott Oct 20, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The American Indian College Fund celebrates its 25th anniversary with a fundraiser in New York on Monday. The nonprofit was created to assist the country’s more than 30 tribal colleges and universities. These are federally-funded schools located on or near native lands.

Only about 10 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives have a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to about 30 percent of all adults, according to the group.

The big reason is poverty, says president Cheryl Crazy Bull. Tribal colleges cost on average $15,000 a year to attend, she says. The maximum federal Pell grant for low-income students covers only $5,730. 

“It’s a very affordable education,” Crazy Bull says. But for students living on reservations with a 60 to 80 percent unemployment rate, “it’s a huge gap.”

The College Fund tries to bridge that gap with scholarships. It’s aiming to raise an extra $25 million this year.

The group recently got a boost from Comcast and NBC Universal: $5 million in ad time for a new public service campaign.

Here are a few numbers from the American Indian College Fund:

Up to 95 percent

The unemployment rate on some American Indian reservations. In total, almost 29 percent of American Indians on reservations live below the federal poverty level. 

$16,777

The per capita income of American Indians and Alaska Natives, according the American Community Survey in 2013. Meanwhile, the average cost of attendance at a tribal college or university is $14,566.

10 percent

That’s approximate percentage of American Indian and Alaska Natives who have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to about 30 percent of all adults. Natives have the lowest educational attainment rates of all ethnic and racial groups in America.

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.