Find the latest episode of "This Is Uncomfortable" here. Listen
BBC World Service

Ukraine’s economy, as felt on the street

James Reynolds Apr 15, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY
BBC World Service

Ukraine’s economy, as felt on the street

James Reynolds Apr 15, 2014
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Ukraine launched a “special operation” on Tuesday to push pro-Russian militants out of an airbase they had occuppied in the eastern part of that country. In Kiev, the interim government declared a victory over rebels by saying the air base had been “liberated”. But there was no sign of militants.

“You drive along normal roads, the traffic police keep an eye on everybody’s speed, you get to town squares [and] you see people playing in playgrounds, buses running on time, so that’s all on one side,” said the BBC’s James Reynolds in Donetsk. “But then when you see some of the occupations, you see men walking around with sticks, balaclavas, ski masks. You see protesters inside Ukrainian government buildings, taken over by Russian protesters, stocking up on food, on macaroni.”

In Washington, the administration said it was not considering sending arms to Ukraine but that it was “seriously considering” additional sanctions. 

“Ukraine needs help from abroad, that’s what the interim government knows, and indeed, where Ukraine should get that economic help from abroad is what precipitated this crisis back in November,” Reynolds says. “Essentially the problem from Ukraine is that its got to choose help and it has to either choose, ‘do you get the bulk of that help from Russia … or do you go to the EU and the United States?'”

Russian stock market shares fell about three percent.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.