Soldiers wearing chain mail loading baskets of stones on to a trebuchet behind the walls of a castle circa 1400. Keep this in mind when you're talking to the boss. 
Soldiers wearing chain mail loading baskets of stones on to a trebuchet behind the walls of a castle circa 1400. Keep this in mind when you're talking to the boss.  - 
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Talking to your boss, or even worse –your boss’s boss, can be one of the most awkward parts of office life. Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker are here to help with this excerpt from their new book, “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with your Boss’s Boss”. 

The doom of the unknown co-worker:
You should know this guy’s name by now -- he’s in sales and you’re in marketing.  You run into him every two weeks. He looks like a Scott, but he’s not a Scott.

What to do?

Visit the Social Security Administration web site -- they have a list of the most popular birth names by year. Guess the unknown co-worker’s age, study the top names for those years, and be ready to play the odds during your next encounter.

The Interview:
Most of us try to be too original during job interviews. Behold:

BOSS: We’re looking for a manager who can build our core competencies.

PROSPECTIVE NEW HIRE: I’m a Trebuchet m’lady, a War Wolf. I will hurl flaming orbs of competency at your charge d’affairs.

BOSS: …We'll be in touch.

To succeed in an interview, you’ve got to use the gift that’s given you -- listen to what the interviewer is saying and repeat her language.

BOSS: We’re looking for a manager who can build our core competencies.

PROSPECTIVE NEW HIRE: I hear you saying you want someone who can really build on your core competencies.

BOSS: You’re hired!

It's that easy – you're now on your way to a brown-belt in the talking arts. With your new mastery of conversation, you'll cruise through the next office holiday party, conference call, and trip to the water cooler!

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