BBC World Service

Facebook (sort of) lifts ban on graphic videos

Molly Wood Oct 23, 2013
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BBC World Service

Facebook (sort of) lifts ban on graphic videos

Molly Wood Oct 23, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Update (10/23): Not so fast. Facebook released a statement that went over the ground rules on removal of graphic videos. Basically, if Facebook feels a graphic video is being shared for “sadistic pleasure or celebrates violence,” they’ll delete it:

As part of our effort to combat the glorification of violence on Facebook, we are strengthening the enforcement of our policies.

First, when we review content that is reported to us, we will take a more holistic look at the context surrounding a violent image or video, and will remove content that celebrates violence.

Second, we will consider whether the person posting the content is sharing it responsibly, such as accompanying the video or image with a warning and sharing it with an age-appropriate audience.

Based on these enhanced standards, we have re-examined recent reports of graphic content and have concluded that this content improperly and irresponsibly glorifies violence. For this reason, we have removed it.

Original Post: Facebook’s censorship policies have come under scrutiny again this week. Already this year the social network has been criticized for its stance on everything from breast feeding photos to images depicting violence towards women. Now, the BBC has discovered that a temporary ban on graphic videos showing things like decapitation had been lifted by Facebook. Mark Gregory, technology correspondent for the BBC, has the latest on the story.

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