Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Premium rockin' in the stream world

Sep 18, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Less than zero

Sep 17, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

How’s the shutdown going to affect Twitter’s IPO?

David Gura Oct 4, 2013
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Twitter has gone public with its plans to go public. We can now take a look at the S-1 form the social media company filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Twitter hopes to raise a billion dollars. 

So far, the government shutdown has not affected the SEC. With some cash left over, the regulator says it’s still “open and operational.” But if the shutdown drags on, things could change.

“As long as the SEC is back at their desks in three weeks, Twitter will be fine,” Len Blum says. He is managing partner at Westwood Capital, LLC.

Twitter filed its IPO confidentially a few weeks ago, so the SEC had a chance to review it before the shutdown started. A bigger variable, potentially, is the debt ceiling debate.

“You know, what Washington is doing or not doing these days has an effect on the market,” Blum says.

Twitter will begin what’s called a ‘road show.’ Executives will talk to potential investors and underwriters will get a sense of what the company’s stock price should be.

“You know, if you wait for the congress to stop being dysfunctional, you’re never going to go public,” Tim Pollock says. He is the Farrell Professor of Entrepreneurship in the Management and Organization Department at Penn State University Smeal College of Business.

After the road show, and once Twitter gets the SEC’s approval, the shutdown may be over. Then, Twitter will have some flexibility to decide when its stock will go on sale.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

“I use clips from the show in my classes so students can grasp complex ideas and make connections to their own lives.”
Ashley, Ft. Worth, TX
Marketplace Investor