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American Futures

PODCAST: "American Futures" and the power of maps

Kai Ryssdal Aug 26, 2013
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The halting pace of the economic recovery is all too apparent, despite glimmers of hope in housing and other sectors. But in some places, the recovery has ended and the economy is in expansion mode.

One of those places is Sioux Falls, S.D., a city which has more to do with the American and global economy than you might think. 

“This is the beginning of a trip we’re going to be doing, going to smaller towns in America that have interesting economic stories, technologic stories, stories of demographic adjustment,” says The Atlantic’s Jim Fallows. “Parts of the American saga that are often left out of our normal news coverage.”

The Interactive:
Explore the Story Map:
Read regular updates from James Fallows during his travels across the country. And explore related interactive maps. More

In addition to working with Fallows, we are partnering with the mapping software company Esri. And Esri CEO Jack Dangermond says the reason maps are so important today — and in the future — is the stories they can tell.

Finally, we hear from one of the voices in Sioux Falls that helped us get a grip on the changes the city has gone through. Sylvia Henkin, 92, moved to the city in 1944 — and has seen it turn into a center for agriculture, credit cards and now health care.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

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When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.