Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Huawei sans the USA

Sep 19, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Corner Office from Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Could California’s humane chicken law hatch a national trend? (Map)

David Weinberg Jun 13, 2013
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Among the many big issues Congress has on its plate — immigration, sequestration and healthcare reform — there are countless smaller battles waged between law makers. One of those battles is about eggs, and it has hatched into a much bigger debate over states’ rights.

In 2010, California voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 2, which set standards for how egg-laying hens could be raised. It requires hens have enough space in their cages to spread their wings.

Congressman Jared Huffman partnered with the Humane Society on the proposition.

“I ran my bipartisan legislation to make it very clear that this standard was uniform for all eggs sold,” Huffman says.

In other words, all eggs sold in California had to meet the standard. But opponents of the law argue that it shouldn’t apply to eggs laid outside California. Congressman Steve King of Iowa, the largest egg-producing state,  proposed an amendment to the farm bill that would bar states from imposing their agricultural standards on other states.

“Congressman King’s amendment does not set a national standard for egg production,” says Mitch Head with United Egg Producers, a trade group that wants a national standard for raising hens. It believes a national standard would settle the issue once and for all and make it easier for all egg producers to comply with the law.


Where are all the other laws regulating crops and livestock? Check our map.

 

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.