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Inside CES

An audio postcard from the floor of CES 2013

Queena Kim Jan 11, 2013
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Inside CES

An audio postcard from the floor of CES 2013

Queena Kim Jan 11, 2013
HTML EMBED:
COPY

The Consumer Electronics Show wrapped up in Las Vegas this week. CES is the world’s biggest electronics trade fair with 20,000 products spread out over close to 2 million square feet. We sent Markeplace’s Queena Kim out to take a quick look. She spent an hour running through the halls at CES.

She started at the central hall, where she found every iPad, iPod, and iPhone case known to man. Inside the hall she found a company called The Joy Factory, which featured the kind of novelty items that CES is known for.

“We actually showcase the waterproof, ‘submergable’ iPhone cases and iPad cases,” said one of the workers. “You can watch movies, you can use your iPhone or iPad under water.”

Queena’s next stop was the area where carmakers were parked. In recent years, automakers have had a big presence at CES — in part to show consumers that they’re hip with technology. But before she got there, she was sidetracked by something called the virtual dressing room, by electronic maker LG. How does it work? You step in front of a screen that is about 3-feet wide and 4-feet tall, a camera clicks on, and you appear on the screen. Then an outfit — sort of like a paper-doll cutout — appears in front of you.

Finally, she reached the Samsung exhibit to see the 110-inch TV. That’s 9 feet, the world’s largest television. It’s expected to come out in 2013.

To hear what it’s like to be on the ground floor at CES, click play on the audio player above.

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