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Apple-Samsung confusion paying off for Samsung

Queena Kim Sep 12, 2012
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Apple-Samsung confusion paying off for Samsung

Queena Kim Sep 12, 2012
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Stacey Vanek Smith: Not that you need to reminded, but Apple is expected to unveil the iPhone 5 later today. Think anyone will confuse it for a Samsung? Last month a jury ruled that Samsung copied Apple’s iPhone and iPad. And while Samsung got fined more than a billion dollars, the trial might have helped sales.

as Marketplace’s Queena Kim explains.


Queena Kim: Being a tech reporter, people often call me up for advice.

Darline Miller: Oh hi Queena, it’s Dar.

That’s Darline Miller, my mother-in-law. And she was planning to buy an iPad. But after a jury found that Samsung copied Apple, Darline left this message.

Miller: Now, that it’s come out that Samsung’s stolen all the iPads features. What the heck? I might as well go with the Samsung.

Trip Chowdrey is analyst with Global Equities Research. He says Darline isn’t the only one who bought Apple’s claim Samsung is just like Apple.

Trip Chowdrey: The verdict did raise the visibility of Samsung.

Especially for Samsung’s Galaxy S3 smartphone. Chowdrey surveyed more than a dozen retailers and found that since the verdict, the Galaxy S3 has been outselling the iPhone. His theory, consumers said:

Chowdrey: OK let’s see what this Galaxy S3 is and when they liked they bought it.

Of course, Apple fans have been on the sidelines waiting for a new iPhone. And so, the real face-off starts later today.

I’m Queena Kim for Marketplace.

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