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Codebreaker

Forget Project Glass, Google’s prototype glasses, the U.S. military just agreed to purchase tech-enhanced contact lenses.

Marc Sanchez Apr 13, 2012
Codebreaker

Forget Project Glass, Google’s prototype glasses, the U.S. military just agreed to purchase tech-enhanced contact lenses.

Marc Sanchez Apr 13, 2012

OK, so Innovega’s augmented reality lenses aren’t quite the same as Google glasses, but the Pentagon has still dropped some coin on the technology. The contact lenses are paired with heads up displays (HUDs), which are glasses that transmit information to the lenses. The outcome is that troops will have a much wider field of vision. From the BBC:
The lenses work by allowing the wearer to focus on two things at once – both the information projected onto the glasses’ lenses and the more distant view that can be seen through them.
They do this by having two different filters.
The central part of each lens sends light from the HUD towards the middle of the pupil, while the outer part sends light from the surrounding environment to the pupil’s rim.
The retina receives each image in focus, at the same time.
Innovega has big plans for the technology. Gamers could be immersed in the game (Tron style!). Mom and dad can even don the eyewear while watching TV for their own personal iMax. I can’t wait to watch the next season of NOVA among the planets.

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