A bumblebee collects nectar from a flower during a warm spring sunny day. World bee populations have been dwindling, and two new research papers might have a reason why. SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images
Mid-day Update

Bee population decline linked to common pesticide

Jeremy Hobson and Stacey Vanek Smith Mar 30, 2012
A bumblebee collects nectar from a flower during a warm spring sunny day. World bee populations have been dwindling, and two new research papers might have a reason why. SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images

Bee populations in the U.S. — and even other parts of the world — have been on the decline, which has many worried. Well, two new studies out might have figured out a reason why.

Here to talk with us in today’s Mid-Day Extra is Jeff Pettis, a researcher of bees at the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

He explains while this new research is a helpful clue, it isn’t quite enough evidence yet to send pesticides packing. And why should we care about bees in the first place? Well, they contribute to the growth of around one-third of our diet in this country.

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