Waiting around for something to get delivered during a four-hour window can be a frustrating experience -- and it's hurting worker productivity. Some businesses are trying to cut the window by two hours.
Waiting around for something to get delivered during a four-hour window can be a frustrating experience -- and it's hurting worker productivity. Some businesses are trying to cut the window by two hours. - 

You probably know the drill by now: You buy something -- let's say a dishwasher -- you want it delivered, and a company promises it'll show up in a four-hour window. It can be maddening, all that waiting.

According to the Wall Street Journal, more than half of adults say they've used a vacation day or sick day to just wait around.

But that could change. The Journal reports there's a trend afoot: companies are trying to calm customers by decreasing the wait window to two hours, and letting people know when the delivery truck gets close.

On today's Mid-day Extra, we talk to Rebecca Wettemann, vice president of Nucleus Research, about the relationship between these long wait windows and lost productivity.

“I think the best compliment I can give is not to say how much your programs have taught me (a ton), but how much Marketplace has motivated me to go out and teach myself.” – Michael in Arlington, VA

As a nonprofit news organization, what matters to us is the same thing that matters to you: being a source for trustworthy, independent news that makes people smarter about business and the economy. So if Marketplace has helped you understand the economy better, make more informed financial decisions or just encouraged you to think differently, we’re asking you to give a little something back.

Become a Marketplace Investor today – in whatever amount is right for you – and keep public service journalism strong. We’re grateful for your support.

Follow Jeremy Hobson at @jeremyhobson