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Letters: Disliking on Facebook, our April Fools’ joke

Marketplace Staff Apr 6, 2011
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Letters: Disliking on Facebook, our April Fools’ joke

Marketplace Staff Apr 6, 2011
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Bob Moon: It’s Wednesday, time for your letters.

We’ll start today with Facebook. Last week, commentator Rob Walker shared why he doesn’t like the idea of a ‘dislike’ button on Facebook. Many of you wrote in to share your dislike of his idea.

Mike Collins from Fredrick, Md., says a dislike button would be useful.

Mike Collins: I’d like to see one. Such a button would be appreciated when someone post news of the loss of a loved one, the death of a pet or a diagnosis of cancer. No one wants to hit the like button for news like that.

Megan Cogswell of Salem, Ore., says although Mr. Walker may think Facebook is superficial, it does provide an important tool for staying in touch.

Megan Cogswell: I agree as a whole that Facebook is shallow and contrived, but I stay on because we have a huge family. When a family member was recently very ill, it gave a large group of people a way to stay in touch. Without Facebook, I might not know our niece was pregnant with twins yet. It’s nice to be in the loop.

On our April 1st show, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to fool some of our listeners. Sally Herships reported a piece about advertisers putting their marketing right on food.

Kyle Mehling from Yardley, Penn., says, good job.

Kyle Mehling: You had me until the very end, and I have to agree with everyone else who wrote in that it’s way too realistic-sounding. I remember when CBS was going to market their lineup on chicken eggs, so this just isn’t that far from reality.

It’s not all Facebook and tomfoolery. Monday, we interviewed bank consultant Mike Moebs about Citibank’s move to reduce the number of bounced checks their clients have by clearing smaller amounts first.

John Arthur from Austin, Texas, says banks should just leave things the way they are. Just process them in the order they come in, he suggests, but do it promptly so balances are current, and people can keep up with things.

Sounds like the way I balance my account — moment-to-moment.

We’re always eager to check your thoughts.

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