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Local Budgets

Ohio to vote on anti-union law

Bill Cohen Mar 30, 2011
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Local Budgets

Ohio to vote on anti-union law

Bill Cohen Mar 30, 2011
HTML EMBED:
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Jeremy Hobson: Well first it was Wisconsin. And now Ohio is looking to curb collective bargaining rights for unionized public workers. Ohio lawmakers are expected to vote on a bill today.

Bill Cohen reports from Columbus.


Bill Cohen: Union activists call the Ohio collective bargaining bill worse than Wisconsin’s because the Ohio plan impacts twice as many workers. Plus, it weakens bargaining power even for police and firefighters, and it says public employees no longer have to pay the equivalent of union dues.

Republican Governor John Kasich loves the bill. He says it would help government cut costs and avoid tax hikes, so Ohio could attract new companies and jobs.

John Kasich: If a company can’t manage its costs, it usually goes bankrupt. But if a company can manage its costs, and if the state can manage its costs, and if local government can manage its costs, we’re going to be on the right footing.

Democrats and unions, though, see this as a Republican plan to wipe out their power base. Thousands of police, teachers and prison guards have been protesting.

Republicans have the votes to push the bill through, but critics have a plan B — a petition drive that would put the law onto the ballot, so voters could kill it.

In Columbus, I’m Bill Cohen for Marketplace.

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