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LETTERS: Healthy eating, the Bush tax cuts

Marketplace Staff Nov 17, 2010
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LETTERS: Healthy eating, the Bush tax cuts

Marketplace Staff Nov 17, 2010
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TEXT OF STORY

Kai Ryssdal: It’s Wednesday — time to sort through the inbox, hear what you have to say.

And we’re going to start things off with a salty, tasty treat. Wendy’s is rolling out some new french fries, as we told you last week, seasoned with sea salt, instead of regular old table salt.

Our story brought forth the health-minded among you, including Dr. John Messmer of Palmyra, Penn.

John Messmer: Sea salt tastes different because of the minerals present in addition to sodium. But it is not healthier. There are ways for people to use sea salt — I use it myself in cooking — but one must understand how much is acceptable.

The Marketplace foodie contingent was also talking about our piece yesterday on the rising costs of eating more of what’s good for you.

Sarah Delevan lives right here in Los Angeles.

Sarah Delevan: I feel bad saying this, but I believe that this article does a disservice to any reader who doesn’t already know better. My husband and I eat a fully organic diet, including meats, on a budget of $40 a week or less.

Catherine Sloan of Smithville, Tenn., were irked by our choice of words as we explained the Bush tax cuts, and why the discussion of whether to extend ’em or not turns on that $250,000 pivot. We said for the .1 percent of Americans that take in more than $2.2 million a year, those tax cuts mean an average half million dollar. And this is where we got into trouble: Windfall, we said.

Windfall, Ms. Sloan points out, sounds like winning the lottery rather than people getting to keep their own money. Would you, she wrote, describe a tax increase as a windfall for the government?

We also looked into the government creating an online privacy czar last week. James Dailey wrote from Seattle to say that marketers spying on you can have its perks.

James Dailey: If I, as a single, employed, male living in Seattle, never have to see a feminine hygiene wash ad, or a diapers ad or a debt consolidation ad, then it’s a win for society as a whole. The advertisers saved their money, and I saved my time.

Time saved is never a bad thing. So we’re gonna wrap it up, just in time for you to send us your thoughts about what you hear on the broadcast.

We’re here to help you navigate this changed world and economy.

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