What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell Us

Slideshow: The 10 scariest jobs

Marketplace Staff Oct 21, 2010

Using phobia rankings based on data from Merck Medical Library and the Library of the Surgeon General, CareerCast.com has revealed the top 10 scariest jobs of 2010.

And the scariest job is… forensic entomologist. What exactly does a forensic entomologist do? They use insect knowledge in crime-related legal cases, like analyzing bug activity in a cadaver to determine a person’s time of death or if the body has been moved. If you’ve seen the movie “The Silence of the Lambs,” you might have a good sense of what exactly the job entails.

“It’s no surprise that Forensic Entomologist came out on top,” said Tony Lee, publisher of CareerCast.com, in a press release. “Forensic Entomologists carve up cadavers in search of crime scene clues, but with a unique twist – their specialty is not the bodies themselves, but the insects living inside the bodies. Forensic Entomologists can determine the time or place a crime occurred based on the type of beetles, flies or maggots living inside the victim.”

The second scariest job of 2010? Miner. The dangers of mining were recently highlighted with the rescue of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for 69 days. Among the fears involved in mining are claustrophobia, achluophobia (fear of darkness), and mysophobia (fear of germs or dirt).

And rounding out the top three is the job of broadcast tower technician, who has to climb thousands of feet for routine maintenance of broadcast towers — often free climbing.

See the rest of the top 10 list in our slideshow.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.