Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Episode 123: Why even have a debt ceiling?

Jul 23, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

Deal or no deal

Jul 23, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Corner Office from Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Blood banks fight for high school kids

Marketplace Staff Sep 3, 2010
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TEXT OF STORY

BILL RADKE: In Orlando, Fla., this week saw the conclusion of a bloody battle for the hearts — or at least the veins — of local high school kids. Two rival blood banks were trying to out-bid each other
for the right to hold blood drives at 19 local high schools.

From WMFE in Orlando, Judith Smelser reports.


JUDITH SMELSER: An Orlando-based group called Florida’s Blood Centers has always given away token prizes at blood drives in Orange County high schools — things like T-shirts and movie tickets. This year, the blood bank offered money, more than $50,000 to the schools themselves.

What changed? Mike Pratt is the blood bank’s interim CEO.

MIKE PRATT: Now of course the schools are under financial pressures, and here’s an opportunity for some scholarship money for their students.

But there’s another factor. For the first time this year, his group had competition. A rival blood bank based in South Florida offered to pay the county schools for the right to hold high school blood drives. The local group won out in the end.

School district chief of staff Kathy Palmer says money had nothing to do with it.

KATHY PALMER: The deciding factor on that was that the blood stays locally with all that they collect.

But Florida’s Blood Centers will be out a whole lot of money it wasn’t expecting to spend. The cost will be passed along to area hospitals that already pay around $200 for each pint of red blood cells they get.

In Orlando, I’m Judith Smelser for Marketplace.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.