Find the latest episode of "The Uncertain Hour" here. Listen

Thanks for writing us!

Marketplace Staff Apr 6, 2007
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Thanks for writing us!

Marketplace Staff Apr 6, 2007
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TESS VIGELAND:
I’ve been yammering on for 51 minutes. It’s your turn. Now, I promised not to tattle, but many of you are not child-friendly when it comes to allowances. Last week, we aired a feature on doling out dollars to the kids. John Havart is from Fort Collins, Col. He doesn’t buy that children need their own buying power.

JOHN: It is a myth that giving your child money will somehow translate to learn good money management skills. Kids learn how to manage money by observing how their parents manage their money. Parents need to teach their children how to shop, how to save money and how not to get into impulse buying. This is done by example and discussion. Take the allowance money and put it into a college savings account and show your child how the money will grow.

VIGELAND: But, dad. Oh, never mind. Also, last week, our Day in the Work Life segment profiled a job that only exists for the money set. Your own personal wallet carrier, someone who carries around all your cash and stock certificates and credit cards, a living, breathing ATM machine. But did you catch the date on our story? Lori Brenner listens to us in Charlotte, N.C.

LORI: You almost had me, although several aspects of the story seemed odd to me. Like, why would somebody need to wake someone else up to shop at Amazon.com at 3 o’clock in the morning? When Amazon saves credit card information. I was almost willing to chalk up the wallet man profession as just another sign that billionaires have too much money until I heard that Joe King was a producer of the show.

VIGELAND:
One thing we never joke about is your feedback. Send us your comments, critiques, complaints. Visit our web site, marketplace.org and click on Contact or you can call us, our number is 877-ASK-MONY. That’s 877-275-6669.

Marketplace is on a mission.

We believe Main Street matters as much as Wall Street, economic news is made relevant and real through human stories, and a touch of humor helps enliven topics you might typically find…well, dull.

Through the signature style that only Marketplace can deliver, we’re on a mission to raise the economic intelligence of the country—but we don’t do it alone. We count on listeners and readers like you to keep this public service free and accessible to all. Will you become a partner in our mission today?

Your donation is critical to the future of public service journalism. Support our work today – for as little as $5 – and help us keep making people smarter.