Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Toy tariff story

Nov 20, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

Flying with baby just got easier

Kai Ryssdal Sep 6, 2006
Share Now on:

TEXT OF INTERVIEW

KAI RYSSDAL: This final note before we go today . . . I just came back from vacation. We drove, we didn’t fly, which was nice because with three kids there’s a lot of stuff to carry on a plane. Until now, the only safe way to strap one of ’em in was to haul a car seat along. Kind of an inconvenient solution. But today, the FAA approved a harness that connects to a regular seatbelt. It weighs about a pound — way less than a car seat. The inventor is Mrs. Louise Stoll of Burlington, Vermont. She says her own family gave her the idea.

LOUISE STOLL: The inspiration for this was my oldest daughter visiting me and coming off a plane carrying a toddler, a diaper bag, big heavy car seat about 20 pounds and she was about seven months pregnant and that was when it dawned on me that there had to be a better way than the car seat.

RYSSDAL: Now I imagine you also had to get the Federal Aviation Administration to buy off on this as well?

STOLL: Well then that just started, you can’t bring something like this on a plane, so three and a half years ago the process started with the Federal Aviation Administration.

RYSSDAL: Now we should say you’re not the average 60-something grandmother of eight. You sorta know the ropes of the Department of Transportation.

STOLL: That is true.

RYSSDAL: You were there during the Clinton Administration, do I have that right?

STOLL: Yes I was the assistant secretary of the United States Department of Transportation for Budget and Programs for the first term of the Clinton Administration and halfway into the second term and then I returned into the private sector. But this episode with my daughter that inspired this came a number of years later.

RYSSDAL: Before I let you go, Mrs. Stoll, how are sales?

STOLL: Oh we don’t know yet.

RYSSDAL: Aha.

STOLL: We are taking pre-orders at this point and as soon as inventory is up, which should be in a couple of weeks, we’ll be sending them out.

RYSSDAL: Now if I need one, how much is it going to run me?

STOLL: $74.95

RYSSDAL: Louise Stoll thank you very much for your time.

STOLL: Thank you very much

RYSSDAL: That was Louise Stoll from her home in Burlington, Vermont. Her invention, a child harness for airplane seats, was approved today by the FAA.

Fall of the Berlin Wall
Fall of the Berlin Wall
The financial lessons of Germany's reunification 30 years ago.  
Check Your Balance ™️
Check Your Balance ™️
Personal finance from Marketplace. Where the economy, your personal life and money meet.
How We Survive
How We Survive
Climate change is here. Experts say we need to adapt. This series explores the role of technology in helping humanity weather the changes ahead.