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"Claim and suspend" Social Security

Question: Is it worthwhile for me to defer receiving Social Security benefits for a few years until I actually need them? I am started receiving benefits at age 62 and am now 66. I would like to defer the payments until the age of 71 or longer, if possible. I have heard that the payments can be stopped and restarted at a later date, but I have been unable to locate any information on this on the Social Security website. Do you have any suggestions or comments? I am a faithful listener. Thank you for the informative and entertaining programs you present each Sunday night! Nancy, Mountain View, CA.

Answer: The tactic is commonly known as "claim and suspend." If you voluntarily suspend your Social Security payments you will earn retirement credits that will permanent increase your future monthly benefits. It can be a smart strategy if you earn enough to support yourself without the Social Security money. If the numbers work in your favor, suspending will increase the amount of future monthly Social Security benefits you'll receive. Those benefits are valuable since they're default free, payable for life and protected against increases in the consumer price index.

You can elect to suspend if you are at your full retirement age, which is age 66 for those born between 1943 and 1954. You must be 70 and under to do it. So, you can't defer to 71. You should be able to go to any Social Security office and make the request and the form. You can also call 1-800-772-1213. Anne Tergesen, a terrific reporter at the Wall Street Journal (and former colleague) did a nice piece on this.

For those interested in going into much more detail, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College looked into claim -and-suspend. The information is good but the article is dense and scholarly.

About the author

Chris Farrell is the economics editor of Marketplace Money.

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