Foreign investors move from dollar

Frankfurt Stock Exchange

TEXT OF STORY

Steve Chiotakis: Overseas, they're keeping a close eye. While reaction stateside may be, "How low can it go?" In Europe, it's much ado about the dollar, and how it's trading against the Euro and other foreign currencies. From London, Stephen Beard reports.


Stephen Beard: In recent days, foreign investors have been moving out of the greenback. They assume the Fed will cut short-term interest rates again today. And that will mean that money deposited in the U.S. will earn a derisory return -- a half of 1 percent or less. And the dollar doesn't now seem quite as attractive a place for foreigners to put their money.

Professor Ian Marsh at the Cass Business School:

Ian Marsh: People are just looking for safety. America was the safe place to go, it probably is no longer because there's big uncertainty over what the Fed will do in the future.

Once the Fed has cut interest rates close to zero, it may have to resort to all sorts of unconventional measures to pump up the money supply and pull the U.S. economy out of recession.

In London, this is Stephen Beard for Marketplace.

About the author

Stephen Beard is the European bureau chief and provides daily coverage of Europe’s business and economic developments for the entire Marketplace portfolio.

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