The new rules of internships

Scotusblog.com intern Dan Stein

In this widely-circulated image, Scotusblog.com intern Dan Stein ran with news of affirmative action ruling front of the U.S. Supreme Court building June 24, 2013 in Washington DC. Soon, the question of internships - unpaid internships especially - may make it higher up the legal ladder.  

Summer's almost here, the traditional season of the internship.

 

But interns beware: in the last few years a series of lawsuits against employers offering unpaid internships have changed the rules of the apprenticeship game.

 

Rachel Feintzeig is a management reporter for the Wall Street Journal, and has been writing about the plight of the new internship.

 

In recent years, internships have become a near-necessity for college students trying to stand out in a brutal job market. And while some positions can provide valuable work experience and a glimpse into corporate life, critics maintain that the stints often amount to little more than unpaid labor.

 

A survey last year from the National Association of Colleges and Employers suggests unpaid internships don't help students land full-time jobs. Alums of unpaid internships had full-time job offers at nearly the same rate as those who had no internships at all—about 37%, compared with 62% for those with paid internships.

To read more about how internships are changing, read Rachel's article for the Wall Street Journal

About the author

In more than 20 years in public radio, Barbara Bogaev has served as the longtime guest host of NPR’s flagship program Fresh Air with Terry Gross, as well as host of APM’s news and culture magazine, Weekend America and the weekly national documentary series, Soundprint.

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