Irish citizens are worried the bailout will divide the country

A protester waves an Irish flag outside the Irish Prime Ministers office in Dublin, Ireland, on November 21, 2010.

TEXT OF STORY

STEVE CHIOTAKIS: So how are the Irish people feeling about asking their neighbors for help?

The BBC's Louise Williams asked Dubliners how they're feeling.


LOUISE WILLIAMS: There's shame and anger on the streets of Dublin -- shame that the once roaring economy has come to this, anger that the government and the bankers let it happen.

As she rushed to work, one government worker told me she feels like the country has had to put the begging bowl out.

Kathy didn't want to give her last name but was worried this would divide the country.

KATHY: I think it's a very sad day for all our patriots who gave their lives for this country. Look at the mess that we're in at the moment. Hopefully we'll stick together on this one, we won't end up like the civil war.

Details are scarce on the program and the big question remains whether Ireland will keep its famously attractive business tax.

The Irish politicians continue to say it's non-negotiable but many people here have lost confidence in their word.

In Dublin, I'm the BBC's Louise Williams for Marketplace.

Comments

I agree to American Public Media's Terms and Conditions.
With Generous Support From...