Beijing's bad air quality has an economic impact


  • Photo 1 of 3

    A general view of the CCTV towers, headquarters of China Central Television, in Beijing on January 12, 2013. In the past few days, Beijing has experienced the worst air quality levels since the Chinese government and U.S. embassy began recording.

    - China Chas/Flickr

  • Photo 2 of 3

    A general view of the CCTV towers, headquarters of China Central Television, in Beijing 24 hours later, on January 13, 2013. Over the weekend, the air quality index registered as high as 755 in Beijing. New York City, by comparison, registered a level of 45 on Monday.

    - China Chas/Flickr

  • Photo 3 of 3

    A general view of the CCTV towers on a clear day in Beijing on August 8, 2008. The city of Beijing has made efforts to reduce pollution by tightening emissions standards and moving factories outside of the city. Yet, smaller cities in the area, where local officials have not prioritized the environment, may be negatively impacting the region.

    - China Chas/Flickr

Air pollution in Beijing was so bad over the weekend that the city ordered all government vehicles off the road and some state owned enterprises were shut down to try and prevent the situation from getting worse. The pollution was around 40 times worse than limits set by the World Health Organization. Rob Schmitz talks with host Jeremy Hobson about the economic impact of China's bad air.

About the author

Rob Schmitz is Marketplace’s China correspondent in Shanghai.

Comments

I agree to American Public Media's Terms and Conditions.
With Generous Support From...