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Behind the Data: TV viewing and income

We used data from the General Social Survey to build this chart, plotting incomes and hours of TV watched on one graph. In order to ensure a large enough sample size for the TV portion of the data set, we compiled income and hours of TV data from the surveys between 2008-2012.

 

Income as defined by the GSS is total family income: the total incomes of each person who lives in a household and is related. To acertain the amount of TV watched, the people conducting the survey asked respondents, "On the average day, about how many hours do you personally watch television?"

 

Responses varied in the original data set from 0-24 hours. We grouped those responses into the following categories: 0 hours, 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, 4 hours and 5+ hours per day.*

 

Help with research was provided by Dr. Tom W. Smith, Director of the General Social Survey and Senior Fellow at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Source: General Social Surveys of NORC at the University of Chicago. 

 


 

*Correction: An earlier version of this story misrepresented the way we grouped the data points. The text has been corrected to reflected the correct methodology.

 

 

About the author

Mary Dooe is an associate producer, and works for both the radio and digital teams.
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Great tool and representation! Congratulations. This is were socio-economic data mining is headed.

Perhaps I'm just confused, but on TV watching the chart and headline and the groupings described in the methods description don't seem to line up (when looking the highest income bracket, e.g., Marissa Mayer).

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