Using your brain to control an exoskeleton

Forty three-year-old parapalegic Robert Woo is outfitted with an exoskeleton device to walk in made by Ekso Bionics as Manuel Maldonado (L) during a demonstration at the opening of the Rehabilitation Bionics Program at Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Center on December 6, 2012 in New York City. 

This month, a neuroscientist and his team announced that the ceremonial first kick at this year's World Cup opening in Brazil would be completed by a paralyzed teenager using an exoskeleton attached to her brain. Prosthetic robotic devices connected to the human brain are becoming more common. You may remember video a few years ago of a woman at the University of Pittsburgh feeding herself chocolate with a robot limb. For today's installment of Marketplace Tech's sports and tech series, "Gaming the System," we'll hear from a guy working in this field.

Dr. Michael Boninger, from the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, tells Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson about bioengineering and using brain signals to control exoskeletons and prosthetics.

 

About the author

Ben Johnson is the host of Marketplace Tech.

Comments

I agree to American Public Media's Terms and Conditions.
With Generous Support From...