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Photo Op-ed: Digital camera etiquette

These days, digital cameras are everywhere. In most cases, our phones double as cameras. But when is it right to snap a picture and when is it not? And how do our kids figure in to all of this?

These days, digital cameras are everywhere. In most cases, our phones double as cameras. But when is it right to snap a picture and when is it not? And how do our kids figure in to all of this?

Janell Burley Hofmann, a Cape Cod mother of five who also teaches parenting workshops, joins Marketplace Tech host David Brancaccio to explain this quandary. 

About the author

Janell Burley Hofmann, is blogger and a Cape Cod mother-of-five.
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It's simply not true that professional photographers need releases before using an image in a magazine. That's only true for marketing, not publishing in general. If I use your image to sell something, I need a release. If you just happen to be out in public, and I take your picture, I am free to publish it, so long as the use is not commercial in nature. That's why paparazzi can do what they do--if releases were required, they'd be out of business.

This is as it should be. Otherwise, it would sure be tough to post a picture on Facebook of your kid on the beach--you'd have to get a release from all the other beach-goers, which would be impractical, to say the least.

It would also have an unacceptable stifling effect on news in general--just imagine a world where racist sheriff Bull Connor could have jailed journalists for using photos which portrayed him and his department in an unflattering light without his permission.

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