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Look out Netflix: Amazon looks into online streaming

The Amazon homepage appears on a screen in Washington on September 3, 2010.

TEXT OF STORY

STEVE CHIOTAKIS: Online retail behemoth Amazon.com already offers online movie rentals. Now it wants to stream movies, a la Netflix. The LA Times reports it may be having technical troubles and delays in securing more studio titles for its internet adventure. Putting off an introduction to the service for at least a few weeks.

John Moe is host of our sister show the Marketplace Tech Report. Good morning John.

JOHN MOE: Hey Steve.

CHIOTAKIS: So Netlfix is already there on DVD players and on televisions too, many of them. Can anything compete with that?

MOE: Sure. It's wide-open economy. It's an open playing field. Where there's a real opportunity is in selection. With Netflix streaming it always feels you're at the video store at about 10pm on Friday and everything's a little bit picked over. So if Amazon can use some of those relations it has with the entertainment industry, over years of selling stuff, and get really good selection, I think they could be in business.

CHIOTAKIS: Is this where we're heading as far as movies go? Streaming?

MOE: Yes, technology wants the easiest path, and if you can sit there and browse through thousands of movies and just call them right up and not have to store them on your computer or any kind of box that you have in your house, it's just way better. Who ever finds the best way to get the most selection and lowest prices is going to do really really well.

CHIOTAKIS: What about bandwidth? That's a lot of bandwidth that this is using.

MOE: The Internet service providers say they're ready for it. I mean they do well if you use your Internet, they'll build out infrastructure. If they can provide you the best service for getting those things across the Internet, then they'll make that happen.

CHIOTAKIS: John Moe, host of our sister program, the Marketplace Tech Report. John, thanks.

MOE: Thanks Steve.

About the author

John Moe is the host of Marketplace Tech Report, where he provides an insightful overview of the latest tech news.
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I guess what I trying to say is this 'service' is not "way better" as indicated in the story. It isn't even better. It is worse.

This is all fine but you still cannot stream lossless HD audio and non-pixelated 1080p video. So this is basically for the masses but not for those that appreciate quality in the picture and especially in the audio. I didn't spend a small fortune on my home theater to play low quality media on it so this really isn't for me.

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